Monday, April 27, 2009

Paper Model of DNA - 2009








If you are looking for the patterns and some pictures for the paper DNA model, please look at my April 8, 2007 posts! Starting with:http://cavalierscience.blogspot.com/2007/04/how-to-make-paper-model-of-dna.htmlhttp://cavalierscience.blogspot.com/2007/04/cut-out-pattern-for-making-paper-model_08.htmlhttp://cavalierscience.blogspot.com/2007/04/cut-out-pattern-for-making-paper-model.htmlThey include the directions and templates for making the model.


Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Unit Outline - Mastery Review - Transporting Chemicals Safely

I found this review that I had put together for Chapter 3 in Kendall/Hunt, Prime Science, Level 1. This might be an interesting way to talk about safety, in addition to going over laboratory safety rules. It's a different way of integrating basic chemistry knowledge with practical everyday application of chemistry to people's lives. All students have seen tanker trucks on the highways.

Mastery Review-Transporting Chemicals

1. What are chemicals?

Made up of matter
Atoms and Elements
Compounds

2. What is the importance of the chemical industry?

Important to manufacturing because it converts raw materials into chemicals that are used to make the products we buy.
Chemicals are made in large amounts (bulk chemicals).
Converts raw materials into products that are used directly, such as fuel.

3. How do you handle chemicals safely?

You need to be able to identify the chemical being transported and need access to information about the chemical.
Proper Labeling
Chemicals need to be properly packaged.
Chemicals need to be transported safely.
Teams of people need to be properly trained to dispose of hazardous materials.

4. What kind of information is on the chemical warning signs?

Hazard Classification (what kind of danger may arise)
Substance name and number code.

5. How to you identify chemical hazards?

Test for:
Flammability
Corrosion of metals
Is the chemical an acid or base?
What substances does the chemical react with?

6. How do you handle chemicals safely?

Know where to find out information about the chemicals.
Use the proper procedures for hazardous chemicals.
Know how to administer first aid.

7. What is the international code for chemistry?

A shorthand system for representing chemicals.
Elements are represented by international symbols.

8. How do we describe chemical reactions?

Word equations
Symbol equations
Balanced equations

9. Who are some important chemists?

John Dalton – said all matter is made of atoms
John Newlands – in 1863, he made the first periodic table by arranging the elements in the order of increasing masses of their atoms.
Dimitri Mendeleev – arranged the elements in the order of increasing masses and also according to similar properties (he put them in columns).

10. How is the modern periodic table used?

One can find the atomic number. (number of protons)
The vertical columns have chemicals with similar properties. (Groups)
One can find out the symbol and name of each element.
One can read a key to find out if an element is a metal, nonmetal, or gas
One can find out the atomic weight, which along with the atomic number, can indicate number of electrons, protons, and neutrons in an atom.

Friday, April 10, 2009

Genetics Project - Three Selected Case Studies in Genetics

The first case study is modified from the case study, The Death of Baby Pierre. I changed the name of the child to make it less likely for my students to search and copy the answers to the questions, from the answers online. So, if my students have decided to look at my blog, they have found the source of Case Study #1, and they can check their answers. For the Hardy-Weinberg equation, I re-wrote that section of the case study, as a guided approach to the answers, because my students have had minimal exposure to the application of quadratic equations. Some of my students still find the equation difficult to understand, but having a question that guides them through the equation, as least makes them somewhat aware that there is a way to apply genetic principles to populations, as well as individuals.
Herreid, Clyde Freeman, "The Death of Baby Pierre," National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science, 18 June 2008. University at Buffalo. <http://ublib.buffalo.edu/libraries/projects/cases/pierre.htm>.
Case Study #1 is about the genetic inheritance of tyrosinemia. Here is a video about a victim of this disorder. The first 5 minutes is informative and I can show that part to my students. The ending includes the family drama of the disorder.
<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sT2erjfwE0s>

Case Study #1
CASE STUDIES IN GENETICS
A DEMONSTRATION OF ACQUIRED KNOWLEDGE
Project Description
INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITY
CASE 1 – Recessive Inheritance


Student Name ________________________ Period _____
Due Date:

The genetics project consists of three directed case studies. For these case studies, you will complete an introductory activity, which is included with this packet. You will receive a “mark of completion” in the teacher’s grade book for having completed the introductory activity, and then you will receive the information that is required for analyzing the cases: The Death of Baby Jeanette, Huntington’s Disease – A Family History, and Hemophilia: The Royal Disease. For these cases, you will be drawing, organizing, and analyzing pedigrees, demonstrating your knowledge of Mendelian genetics, and answering structured questions that are designed to show, in your answers, your understanding of basic genetic principles. This also includes your knowledge of the DNA molecule and its role in inheritance. You will also be playing the role of decision maker as you analyze and state your findings about the cases. So, here we begin:
Case Study #2
This case study was adapted from the case study on this web site:
Martin, Carolyn N, "Its Those Annoying CAG Repeats, A Huntington's Disease Pedigree Using Direct Genetic Testing," Access Excellence at the National Health Museum - Activities Exchange. <http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/AEC/AEF/1995/martin_testing.php>
A short documentary video about Huntington's Disease can be found here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65xf1olEpQM
NBC News video (May 10, 2010): Hacking the Gene Code of Huntington's Disease
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3032619/#37073339
CASE STUDIES IN GENETICS
A DEMONSTRATION OF ACQUIRED KNOWLEDGE
Project Description
INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITY
Case Study #2 – Inheritance of Dominant Alleles


Student Name ________________________ Period _____
Due Date:

The genetics project consists of three directed case studies. For these case studies, you will complete an introductory activity, which is included with this packet. You will receive a “mark of completion” in the teacher’s grade book for having completed the introductory activities, and then you will receive the information that is required for analyzing the cases: The Death of Baby Jeanette, Huntington’s Disease – A Family History, and Hemophilia: The Royal Disease. For these cases, you will be drawing, organizing, and analyzing pedigrees, demonstrating your knowledge of Mendelian genetics, and answering structured questions that are designed to show, in your answers, your understanding of basic genetic principles. This also includes your knowledge of the DNA molecule and its role in inheritance. You will also be playing the role of decision maker as you analyze and state your findings about the cases. You have completed Case #1, which was an exploration of the inheritance of recessive alleles. So, here we are ready to tackle Case #2:
The case study, which is about the inheritance of dominant alleles, can be found on this web site: http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/AEC/AEF/1995/martin_testing.php
Here is another case study activity that is on the same topic, Huntington's Disease:
Case Study #3
Case study #3 demonstrates the pattern of sex-linked inheritance. The case study can be found at this web site:
Aronova-Tiuntseva, Yelena and Clyde Freeman Herreid, "Hemophilia: The Royal Disease,"
National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science, 18 June 2008. University at Buffalo.
<http://www.sciencecases.org/hemo/hemo.asp>

CASE STUDIES IN GENETICS
A DEMONSTRATION OF ACQUIRED KNOWLEDGE
Project Description
INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITY
Case Study #3 – Sex-Linked Inheritance


Student Name ________________________ Period _____
Due Date:

The genetics project consists of three directed case studies. For these case studies, you will complete an introductory activity, which is included with this packet. You will receive a “mark of completion” in the teacher’s grade book for having completed the introductory activities, and then you will receive the information that is required for analyzing the cases: The Death of Baby Jeanette, Huntington’s Disease – A Family History, and Hemophilia: The Royal Disease. For these cases, you will be drawing, organizing, and analyzing pedigrees, demonstrating your knowledge of Mendelian genetics, and answering structured questions that are designed to show, in your answers, your understanding of basic genetic principles. This also includes your knowledge of the DNA molecule and its role in inheritance. You will also be playing the role of decision maker as you analyze and state your findings about the cases. You have completed Case #1, which was an exploration of the inheritance of recessive alleles. You tackled Case #2, which was an exploration of the inheritance of dominant alleles. Now, for the challenge of Case #3:

From an episode of Mysteries at the Museum, on the Travel Channel, here is a video clip about Anastasia, one of the royal descendants, and how DNA analysis was used for identification:
http://www.travelchannel.com/video/the-real-anastasia

Tuesday, April 07, 2009

Phases of Mitosis - Mastery Review Graphic Organizer

This is a review graphic organizer that I made as a companion to Sneakerdog's Phases of Mitosis Worksheet (http://cavalierscience.blogspot.com/2009/04/phases-of-mitosis-activity-worksheet.html). Students use the Phases of Mitosis Worksheet to cut out the phases, sequence them correctly, and make a poster. The following graphic organizer can be used for students to summarize what they have learned about mitosis.


Here is a summary video by the Amoeba Sisters:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-ldPgEfAHI  They also have a website with teaching materials http://www.amoebasisters.com/ a twitter following @amoebasisters and a facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/AmoebaSisters

If you see any links on my blog that do not work, please let me know by submitting a comment.  I would like to keep my blog up-to-date and relevant.

Sunday, April 05, 2009

Cell Structures and Functions Foldable


For those students who are homebound, here are pictures (see below) that show how the cell structure and function foldable was put together. There are four cell structures that are glued onto each edge (16 in all), and the description of the function of each cell structure is glued underneath the flap. This way, students can use this booklet as a study guide. We will also use this booklet for subsequent activities. Other ideas for graphic organizers can be found in:

Zike, Dinah. 2001. Dinah Zike's Big Book of Science for Middle School and High School. Dinah Might Adventure, LP, San Antonio, Texas. web site: http://www.dinah.com/





Here is a web site with lesson resources (including a slide presentation) for Comparing the Cell to a Factory - The Cell as System:  http://sciencenetlinks.com/lessons/cells-2-the-cell-as-a-system/

My students have designed Posters that illustrate cell analogies, using the 9 cell structures on the Comparing the Cell to a Factory Worksheet.  Here are some of the analogies that they have used:  A cell is like a . . . .
House
Human Body
Prison
Computer
Nascar Race
Town
Walmart
Baseball Team
Marching Band
Pick-Up Truck
Bee Hive
Santa's Workshop
Train Station
Boat (Ship)
Basketball Stadium
Mall
Football Team
School
Friendly's Restaurant


If you find any links on my blog that do not work, please let me know by leaving a comment.  I am trying to make sure that my blog is up-to-date and relevant.

Thursday, April 02, 2009

Phases of Mitosis Activity Worksheet

This activity is a worksheet where students cut out the phases of mitosis, sequence them correctly, and then create a poster that illustrates mitosis. I designed this worksheet as a companion teaching aid to this textbook:
McGraw-Hill, Glencoe, Biology: The Dynamics of Life. 2002 and also this website:
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/miracle/divide.html
I was also designing an activity that was a little bit different, so that when students learn about mitosis in subsequent years, students would not end up repeating an activity that they had already done. The worksheet, a teacher's guide, and a completed sample are below:
I've got my mind on mitosis and mitosis on my mind.


Students seem to enjoy this activity. I have students arrange their cells in sequence and check their cells, before students glue the illustrations on a colored piece of 11 x 17 paper. This also allows for a "talk through" of the phases. I also check to make sure students have labeled the structures listed on the worksheet. Make extra copies because there are those who make mistakes, or lose the top part that has the directions. This activity works well for students who may not have the manual dexterity to draw out the phases. There is also a graphic organizer that can be used with this activity: http://cavalierscience.blogspot.com/2009/04/phases-of-mitosis-mastery-review.html




Here is a link to a Smartboard version of Sneakerdog's Phases of Mitosis Worksheet:
http://exchange.smarttech.com/details.html?id=6800407b-77a1-4faf-a5e8-699dd133926c
Here is a link to some pictures that show the phases of mitosis by using donuts! http://www.kevinvanaelst.com/photo10.html

Here is a link to a worksheet that assists in comparing mitosis and meiosis:
http://www.cstephenmurray.com/dnewsom/AcrobatFiles/A&P/mitosismeiosisworksheet.pdf
The worksheet is from the following website, which is authored by Denece Newsom:
http://www.cstephenmurray.com/dnewsom/index.htm
The following link has videos that show real cells dividing:
http://iknow.net/cell_div_education.html
The Amoeba Sisters GIFs are very helpful, humorous, and fun:
https://amoebasistersgifs.blogspot.com/2015/10/mitosis-vs-meiosis.html

I also use this biology coloring book in my teaching about cells:
http://www.powells.com/book/biology-coloring-book-9780064603072/7-2

If you find out that any of the links on my blog do not work, please let me know by leaving a comment.  I would like to keep my blog up-to-date and relevant.